Monday, August 27, 2018

Philip Weiss - New Book Gives Credence to US Ambassador’s Claim That Israel Tried to Assassinate HomE in 1980

This gives your some idea of how the world works. It it's truly evil. I often try to figure out what goes through the minds of the powerful and the elite, are they simply psychopaths? Money is the root of all evil, says the Bible.

 I once said to a Quaker friend that evil was rare, and he said lots of Quakers believe that, but evil is everywhere and was real, he added. I didn't believe him but know I know he was right. 

I don't know how PCR and Steven Lendman sleep at night with what they know. KV

August 24, 2018 "Information Clearing House" -  John Gunther Dean, now 92, and a former American ambassador to five countries, has long maintained that Israel was behind his attempted assassination on August 28, 1980, in a suburb of Beirut, which was attributed to a rightwing Lebanese group. Dean and his wife and daughter and son-in-law were in a motorcade and narrowly escaped serious injury.

Dean said that he was targeted because he was doing something regarded as antithetical to Israel’s interest: consulting with the Palestine Liberation Organization and its head, Yasser Arafat, at a time when such contacts were the third rail in US politics. He was also outspokenly critical of Israeli attacks on Lebanon.

A new book offers backing to Dean’s claim. But while that book has been highly-publicized, the question of whether Israel attacked our ambassador has gotten no attention in the press. That is not a surprise; for Dean has asserted that the case itself was never thoroughly investigated by the U.S. government.

“In January however, a book was published that appears to reinforce the plausibility of Dean’s position. The book is Ronen Bergman’s Rise and Kill First. It has received rave reviews in the US press, and its author has been interviewed countless times since the book was published. The book focuses on Israeli ‘targeted assassinations’ and it contains one truly remarkable revelation.

“In 1979, [Rafael] Eitan and [Meir] Dagan [both brass in the Israel Defense Forces] created the Front for the Liberation of Lebanon from Foreigners, and ran that fictitious group from 1979 to 1983. In 1981 and 1982, Ariel Sharon used that Front to conduct a series of indiscriminate car bombings that killed hundreds of civilians.

“The objective of this massive ‘terrorist’ car bombing campaign was to ‘sow chaos’ amongst the Palestinian & Lebanese civilian population” and, in 1981-82, to provoke the PLO into resorting to ‘terrorism,’ thus providing Israel with an excuse to invade Lebanon.

Information Clearing House

34 comments:

Matt Franko said...

“Money is the root of all evil, says the Bible.”

No it doesn’t it says “philarguria” is A root of the evils... “fondness for silver”....

Andrew Anderson said...

NASB search of 'the love of money'

Tom Hickey said...

1 Timothy 6:10 Young's Literal Translation (YLT)

10 for a root of all the evils is the love of money

Bible Gateway

Note: The author of First Timothy has been traditionally identified as the Apostle Paul. He is named as the author of the letter in the text (1:1). Nineteenth and twentieth century scholarship questioned the authenticity of the letter, with many scholars suggesting that First Timothy, along with Second Timothy and Titus, are not original to Paul, but rather to an unknown Christian writing some time in the late-first-to-mid-2nd century.[1] Most scholars now affirm this view.[2][3] As evidence for this perspective, they put forward that the Pastoral Epistles contain 306 words that Paul does not use in his unquestioned letters, that their style of writing is different from that of his unquestioned letters, that they reflect conditions and a church organization not current in Paul's day, and that they do not appear in early lists of his canonical works.[4]Wikipedia

Greek

ΠΡΟΣ ΤΙΜΟΘΕΟΝ Α΄ 6:10 SBL Greek New Testament (SBLGNT)

10 ῥίζα γὰρ πάντων τῶν κακῶν ἐστιν ἡ φιλαργυρία

From Liddell & Scott

ἀργύρῐον • (argúrion) n (genitive ἀργῠρίου); second declension

small coin, coinage
money
silver

"Silver" is a metaphor for money. Metaphor is a "figure of speech."

French

1 Timothée 6:10 La Bible du Semeur (BDS)

10 Car l’amour de l’argent est racine de toutes sortes de maux[a]»

"L'argent" means both "silver" and "money." Again, metaphor.

German

1 Timotheus 6:10 Schlachter 2000 (SCH2000)

10 Denn die Geldgier ist eine Wurzel alles Bösen.

Geldgier means "greed" or "avarice" for Geld.

"Geld" means "money" in German. It is obviously cognate with "gold." Another metaphor.

Latin

I Timotheum 6:10 Biblia Sacra Vulgata (VULGATE)

10 Radix enim omnium malorum est cupiditas.

The Vulgate just has "cupiditas" which signifies carnal desire aka lust. ""Money" is not mentioned.

Hindi

1 तीमुथियुस 6:10 Hindi Bible: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV-HI)

10 क्योंकि धन का प्रेम हर प्रकार की बुराई को जन्म देता है। कुछ लोग अपनी इच्छाओं के कारण ही विश्वास से भटक गए हैं और उन्होंने अपने लिए महान दुख की सृष्टि कर ली है।

The Hindi "dhan ka prem" is love of money or wealth. The Sanskrit root "dhana" signifies a prize (Rig Veda). In Buddhism it signifies treasure. Compare the saying of Jesus, "Where your treasure is lies your heart also." (Mt 6:21). Money as "prize" and "treasure" are metaphors. (The word for "money" in modern Hindi is "dhan" or "paise.")

Ramakrisha Paramahamsa said that the three obstacles were lust (kam), anger (krodh), and "money" (kanch). When one desire for sex and money is frustrated then anger, potential followed by violence, ensues.

All quotations are from Bible Gateway

Konrad said...

.
--OFF TOPIC –

WELCOME TO THE SURREAL

”John McCain was an American hero, a man of decency and honor and a friend of mine. He will be missed not just in the U.S. Senate but by all Americans who respect integrity and independence. Jane and I send our deepest condolences to his family." ~Bernie Sanders

https://twitter.com/SenSanders/status/1033516711201386502

”John McCain’s legacy represents an unparalleled example of human decency and American service.” ~Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

https://twitter.com/Ocasio2018/status/1033538876370046977

”He meant so much, to so many. My prayers are with his family.”~Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

https://twitter.com/washingtonpost/status/1033524789137350656

”This is a spoof, right?”~ George Galloway

Sadly no.

Tom Hickey said...

Saw that on Twitter. Says volumes.

Andrew Anderson said...

Says volumes. Tom Hickey

Elaborate for the hard of hearing?

Tom Hickey said...

American "progressives" are so-called social democrats on domestic policy and hardliners on foreign policy.

Matt Franko said...

“philarguria” is not a figure of speech...

You can’t substitute a figure of speech in English for a specific term in Greek and expect an accurate translation...

Matt Franko said...

Tom the Roman pantheon wasn’t even established and there is Greek writing using “argurion”...

“Moneta” was a much later goddess in the Roman pantheon... hence the English figure of speech “money” has no equivalent in the Ancient Greek lexicon...

Matt Franko said...

“All quotations are from Bible Gateway“

I’m sure if you went to the Bible Gateway people and asked them if the US could run out of “money” they would say yes...

Konrad said...

McCain is more popular with Democrats than with Republicans.

According to Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll, only 35 percent of Republicans have a positive view of John McCain, while 52 percent of Democrats see him in a positive light.

http://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing-room/358250-mccain-better-liked-by-dems-than-republicans-poll

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Some comments I’ve seen on the Internet…

[1] I didn’t praise Charles Mansion when he died. Why should I praise someone who murdered far more than Manson?

[2] “McCain was a human being with a family.”
Yeah? So is every other mass murderer, along with their victims.

[3] When a good person leaves us, we are diminished. When McCain left us, we became better for his absence. The world is not a better place from having John McCain in it. He will not be missed. R.I.H.

[4] Death doesn’t make you a saint. Burn in hell McCain, and may the souls of your countless victims be at peace.

[5] Sympathy for mass murderers spawns more mass murderers.

Tom Hickey said...

“Moneta” was a much later goddess in the Roman pantheon... hence the English figure of speech “money” has no equivalent in the Ancient Greek lexicon....

Not the way language works. Why are the correlates of English "money," "l'argent" in French and "Geld" in German, both metaphor related to the metals. "Monnaie" means "currency" in French, where as the ordinary language term that correlates to English "money" is "l'argent," as in, Do you have any money? "Est-ce vous ave de l'argent?" means, "Do yo have any money." "Avez-vous de la monnaie" usually means, "Do you have any change?" as in "Do you have any spare change?"

The ancient Greeks did have a word that is translated as "money" in Greek-English dictionaries, nomisma.

The English translation of Koine Greek used in the NT augurion is "money," along with silver, just like the French.

I demonstrated this above in the quotes.

Tom Hickey said...

McCain is more popular with Democrats than with Republicans.

Right. The Dems have joined the bipartisan war party.

Noah Way said...

There is a very long list of people who need to join McCain as quickly as possible.

I have a friend who is a Tibetan Buddhist Monk. He says, "If you are a good person we wish you good health and long life. If you are a bad person we hope you die soon because the world has enough trouble already."

Tom Hickey said...

BTW, "Nomisma" appears only once in the NT and it is not used by Paul at all. It is used in the specific sense of "coin," as the currency of the Roman Empire in which taxes had to be paid. It was stamped with the emperor's face, as the rest of the passage shows

Mt 22 (NSRV) —

19 "'Show me the coin used for the tax.' And they brought him a denarius."

20 Then he said to them, "Whose head is this, and whose title?"

21 They answered, "The emperor's." Then he said to them, "Give therefore to the emperor the things that are the emperor's, and to God the things that are God's."

Tom Hickey said...

I have a friend who is a Tibetan Buddhist Monk

Buddhist joke:

A Buddhist monk meets another monk and greets him with, "What's happening."

The response is, "Nothing ever happens.

Reminds of Ramana Maharshi's response to being asked,

Q. "What about the others?"

A. "There are no others."

Matt Franko said...

“to the emperor the things that are the emperor's, and to God the things that are God's."

Rjght the civil Emperors issued nomisma with their own imprimatrs and the Israelites (God) used silver... two different systems... two different terms .... no figures of speech...

Matt Franko said...

Tom the Greek scriptures are not written in the dialectic...

Matt Franko said...

““Do you think I have come to bring peace on the earth? No, I tell you, not peace, but division!”. Luke 12

He was a Divider not a Uniter.... ie no dialectic synthesis... (that method is “satanic” or think of it as “anti-Christ”)... Paul always got run out of the synagogues (“together teach”) as he tried to use didactic method there, etc and they would throw him out...

Matt Franko said...

Tom according to you, rote learning and kinetic learning are the same thing as they are both “learning”... as if methodology cannot differ...

Tom Hickey said...

Tom the Greek scriptures are not written in the dialectic...

The NT was composed in Koine Greek. Koine means common as does vulgaris in Latin. Koine Greek was the commonly used Greek language in the Hellenistic Empire, and it persisted in Roman times. It was a lingua franca.

In Greece, that is, native speaking Greece, Attic and Doric Greek were still used, and Anatolian Greek was spoken in the Byzantine Empire. (Constantinople is now Istanbul.) Koine was a dialect in comparison with natively spoken Greek. Originally, Koine was not a native language but a dialectic that became a lingua franca. Compare with "the king's English" and the English of the British Empire. American English, Canadian English, Australian English, Indian English are all imperial dialectics, as is the English that is becoming an imperial lingua franca with globalization.

Koine Greek (UK: /ˈkɔɪni/,[1] US: /kɔɪˈneɪ, ˈkɔɪneɪ, kiːˈniː/),[2][3] also known as Alexandrian dialect, common Attic, Hellenistic or Biblical Greek, was the common supra-regional form of Greek spoken and written during the Hellenistic period, the Roman Empire, and the early Byzantine Empire, or late antiquity.[citation needed] It evolved from the spread of Greek following the conquests of Alexander the Great in the fourth century BC, and served as the lingua franca of much of the Mediterranean region and the Middle East during the following centuries. It was based mainly on Attic and related Ionic speech forms, with various admixtures brought about through dialect levelling with other varieties.[4]Wikipediai/Koine_Greek

Jesus demonstrated knowledge of Aramaic and Hebrew, and there is speculation among scholars that he also would have known Koine Greek.

“In what language did Jesus and Pilate converse? There is no mention of an interpreter. Since there is little likelihood that Pilate, a Roman, would have been able to speak either Aramaic or Hebrew, the obvious answer is that Jesus spoke Greek at his trial before Pilate.”https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Fitzmyer, S. J. Fitzmeyer was a prominent biblical scholar who knew the languages.

Tom Hickey said...

Tom according to you, rote learning and kinetic learning are the same thing as they are both “learning”... as if methodology cannot differ...

There you go reading minds and spinning theories out of your head in fields that you know little to nothing about that have long histories and vast literatures.

There are many kinds of learning types, learning styles, models of learning and related matters in the field of eduction, and a lot of scientific research has been done on this. I have been involved in this study and practice for fifty years, since I regard education as the most important relative field of knowledge — along with systems, since all relative knowledge involves systems. They are second only to perennial wisdom in importance. All are highly nuanced in that in addition to general application there is also individual application.

Anonymous said...

In my understanding the root of all evil is the love of money, where: -

Evil = heading in reverse down the evolutionary path (good the opposite); for the human being away from civilisation and back to the jungle.

Love = a particular kind of energy, that can be felt, experienced, enjoyed (not thought about); whose direction is like all energies - to return to its source, lifting other energies with it.

Money = a word symbol denoting the direction of concretisation of human energy, for good or evil.

Common factor direction; elevation.


I think one day the human personality will be seen in this light – criminality being simply a dis-ease of the personality, treated as such through exposure to corrective (healing) energies. No punishment or austerity necessary – just add what is missing; heal and make whole. In the human, the expansion of the heart.

When the heart lights the mind, there is no dialectic – the shadows are there because of the light. When the light becomes really intense, it is everywhere, and the shadows disappear entirely.

The problem is we think human affairs are so real. There is a view from the self that makes human activity on this planet like looking down on an ants nest, or a microbial plate. But still we live down here, and one law of love, is to make things right. Understand direction. Peace is mandatory for the human being. No one escapes that law.

Matt Franko said...

“There you go reading minds and spinning theories out of your head”

No you said ‘nomisma’ and ‘argurion’ are the same thing “Money”.... you’re combining things that are different things via figure of speech...

“Money is money” =. “Learning is learning “ via a combinatorial approach..... if you support a combinatorial (dialectic) method that uses synthesis then you should not be able to discern between eg rote and active forms of teaching/learning...

Keep different things separated in language (unique words) and no confusion should result...

You’ll always know you’re talking about two different things...

If the figure of speech “Money” was never introduced I to the English language we wouldn’t have the current cognitive issues where 99.999% people think we’re still under a metallic based system and we can “run out of money!”....

This is why Alexander mandated the koine Greek... ie to eliminate slang and figures of speech...

Tom Hickey said...

"No you said ‘nomisma’ and ‘argurion’ are the same thing “Money”.... you’re combining things that are different things via figure of speech..."

Not me, good buddy. Take it up with authors of the dictionaries. They are the ones doing the "combining." :o

Why are they doing this? Because dictionaries reflect commonly accepted usage of the terms defined. Dictionary entries change with changes in use in the particular language.

Matt, you are pulling a theory out of your ass that no professional in the related fields subscribes to.

You do this in many fields in which you have no qualifications.

And you criticize others for being unqualified.

Noah Way said...

Franko is materially competent in stupidity, which qualifies him as an idiot.

Matt Franko said...

"you are pulling a theory out of your ass that no professional in the related fields subscribes to. "

No I'm not I'm making empirical observations (science)...

I'm not trained (at least primarily) in the Liberal Art method so I would never do that.. I wouldnt even know how to do it...

You keep making an appeal to (I wouldnt say "authority" as LA uses dialectic not didactic) what is your opinion of some sort of consensus out of the Liberal Art side of the academe... this is what has gotten us into this mess...


Matt Franko said...

Tom,

Go back in time...

Say there was a person with a denarius AND a drachma in his hand... someone would ask him "what do you have in your hand?" he would say "nomisma"..

say a person had a Israelite sheckel in his hand, someone would ask him "what do you have in your hand?" and he would say "argurion"...

Now maybe you have a point where if he had in his hand a denarius, a drachma AND a sheckel all at the same time... they would ask "what do you have in your hand?" he wouldnt say "nomisma" he wouldnt say "argurion" he would say what?

Not "money!" that's for sure... maybe there is a word in the Greek for that combination of objects I think it may be "chematia" which may mean "coins" or something like that which might be closer to the word equivalent for today's "money" in English... but would only be used very infrequently in areas where those two types of systems operated concurrently..

Tom Hickey said...

No I'm not I'm making empirical observations (science)...


Matt, you are acting like many scientists, especially physicians that think they are God, by pontificating beyond the scope of your education and training in fields that have long histories and vast literatures, many of which have scientific aspects, like linguistic and language studies, and education.

There is a name for this — the Dunning-Kruger effect, which "is a cognitive bias in which people of low ability have illusory superiority and mistakenly assess their cognitive ability as greater than it is."

You have a made-up mind, so it is no use in engaging in discussion with you.

lastgreek said...

"In Greece, that is, native speaking Greece, Attic and Doric Greek were still used, and Anatolian Greek was spoken in the Byzantine Empire. (Constantinople is now Istanbul.) Koine was a dialect in comparison with natively spoken Greek. Originally, Koine was not a native language but a dialectic that became a lingua franca..."

Great reminder, Tom.

Example: Anna Komnene's "Alexiad" (12th century) was written in Attic Greek.

PS: Prince Edward Island is one beautiful province. Stunning vistas and beaches. Glad we decided to visit the Canadian Maritimes this summer. Yes... I visited the house of Anne of Green Gables :)

PPS: Since we're talking Greek history, I just want to add, and this will probably get me in trouble but I am saying this as a public service, that there was nothing really Great about Alexander. The Great One was really his father Philip.

Konrad said...

“You have a made-up mind, so it is no use in engaging in discussion with you.”

With all due respect, did you just now figure that out?

What’s that old saying? Never get into a mud fight with a Franko. You’ll just get filthy, and the Franko will love it.

Konrad said...

“There was nothing really Great about Alexander. The Great One was really his father Philip.”

Yes. The West has wildly over-romanticized Alexander. It was Philip II of Macedonia who united the Greeks. Alexander simply piggy-backed on the Achaemenid Empire’s pre-existing social, political, and economic infrastructure. At best, he revitalized Babylon and the Persian Empire. Supposedly he founded some twenty cities, but they already existed. He simply changed their names.

Using the Macedonian phalanx formation, Alexander never met a serious opponent until he invaded India (326 BC). Even then, the Macedonians continued to use the phalanx formation for another 129 years until the Romans annihilated it at the Battle of Cynoscephalae in Greece (197 BC). Nonetheless, even the Romans romanticized Alexander.

In college, I remember one of my history professors discussing, “Alexander the so-called Great” as he said.

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“History is the lies that the victors agree on.” ~ Napoleon Bonaparte

Konrad said...

Speaking of ancient Rome, I sometimes think about the struggles between Rome and Carthage because Hannibal, despite being a great military leader, was never supported by the oligarchs back home in Carthage. Therefore, despite Hannibal’s fabulous successes, Carthage was ultimately obliterated, including the oligarchs.

The Romans suffered several losses in their history, but their worst was against Hannibal at the Battle of Cannae (2 Aug 216 BC).

This must have been awful. At that time there were no guns or artillery. Only swords, spears, and arrows. Greek historian Polybius says that 86,000 Romans were killed in a single day.

Livy (a Roman, writing 200 years later) says it was “only” 67,500.

Of course, the USA killed 126,000 civilians in an instant at Hiroshima.

“Killing Japanese didn't bother me. I suppose if I had lost the war, I would have been tried as a war criminal.” ~ Gen. Curtis LeMay

Yes. You would have been “Hitler.”

Everyone knows that history consists of mostly lies written by the victors. And yet most people insist on believing the lies (e.g. the “six million”™ hoax) so they can imagine themselves to be among the victors.

Tom Hickey said...

The major reason that Alexander is considered great, even the greatest influencer in history, is because he defeated and ended the there-to fore dominant Persian Empire as the successor of the Egyptian Empire in the "West," that is, excluding China and India. This resulted in the Hellenistic Empire, the lingua franca of which was Koine Greek. This subsequently gave way to the Roman Empire.

Western history is traditionally taught as having four pillars.

1. Hebrew-Christian socio-religious tradition

2. Greek intellectual tradition

2. Roman law and organization

4. Modern science

The Hellenistic Empire was largely responsible for disseminating the Greek intellectual tradition. Ironically, Hellenistic thought and culture are also strongly influenced by the Persian tradition that it also became a carrier for even after the demise of the Persian Empire.

Educated Romans knew Greek and read the classics. Many of the teachers and bureaucrats were Greek "slaves" that were highly educated and extremely influential in shaping Rome as a civilization that replaced Hellenic and Hellenistic civilization in the West. Of course, the Byzantine Empire was much more greatly influenced by Hellenism and the Hellenistic Empire, which it replaced in the East. This division is still evident in the division of Christianity into Western (Catholic and Protestant) and Eastern (Orthodox).

Alexander was great historically owing to his pivotal influence, even though the man himself was not particularly notable other than for bravery and risk appetite that some regard as having been rash and could easily have gone wrong at many turns were not a gale force wind of luck behind him.