Sunday, September 11, 2016

Chris Dillow — Meritocracy vs freedom

Theresa May said yesterday:
I want Britain to be the world’s great meritocracy – a country where everyone has a fair chance to go as far as their talent and their hard work will allow.
Of course, we lefties don’t like this: we believe a greater equality of outcome is more feasible and desirable than meritocracy. What’s insufficiently appreciated, however, is that Ms May’s vision should also disquiet the free-market right, because meritocracy is incompatible with freedom.
Just think what a true meritocracy would look like.…
Just deserts and meritocracy are myths of liberal ideology. But May is a conservative, you say. Conservatism is based on economic liberalism as the basis of political liberalism.

Stumbling and Mumbling
Meritocracy vs freedom
Chris Dillow | Investors Chronicle

9 comments:

Matthew Franko said...

Well point #2 in Paul Ryan's 3 point house plan is "no more bailouts..."

The fittest have to survive on their own without any help...

Tom Hickey said...

point #2 in Paul Ryan's 3 point house plan is "no more bailouts..."

Let's see what happens when the next Lehman raises and politicians stare into the Abyss.

Remember how Treasury Secretary Hank the Hammer had to excuse himself from a meeting on the crisis to go out and vomit because he was so terrified.

There is no way that politicians are going to let the financial system collapse. And if they do, their party won't be viable for several generations.

Matthew Franko said...

Yeah and he called his wife in tears from the bathroom all froze up and unable to go back to the meeting...

#girlieman

Matthew Franko said...

Tom look at her words here they dont even make sense:

" a truly meritocratic Britain that puts the interests of ordinary, working class people first."

A meritocracy is one where the interests of the extra-ordinary people get put first... but then right in the same sentence she is talking about ordinary people???

So which one is it? the ordinary or the extra-ordinary?

Cant be both....



Tom Hickey said...

She is just linking buzzwords together. It's persuasion, not reason.

Matthew Franko said...

Seeing how this is going... Tory are going nowhere with any of this bibble-babble imo...

Our only hope is that the idiot Fed starts to raise interest rates in earnest...

This is the only way we are going to get any fiscal expansion short of a new war....

ROW will then follow the US lead as usual pretty pathetic....

Bob said...

Meritocracy = massive estate/inheritance tax

Will never happen.

Kaivey said...

I failed my 11+, all of us kids did. We lived on a council estate and our teachers all told us we would fail. My mum and dad never took much interest in it. We were told by our teachers that the test measured our intelligence an that was something you were born with. Well, we didn't feel very brainy, especially when we had to do long division, yikes!

The night before the test I was with my friends playing football, the next day we all failed the test. When I was in my early twenties I went out with this girl who had a degree in English. After I had been going out with her for a while I learned that her mum groomed her for years to pass the 11+, giving her extra tuition in the evenings.

My mum taught me how to tell the time before I went to school. I picked it up quite easily. When I first went to school I was the only one who could tell the time in my class, so the teacher would ask me to read the time for everyone. My parents made no special effort to teach me anything else.

When I was in my early twenties I went back to college to do an ONC and HNC in electronics and I did maths coming out of my ears. Calculus, differential equations, Fourier Analysis. I was panicking to start with because I was thick at maths at school, but I got 100% in most exams and won awards at the end of the year because my grades were so good. When I put my mind to it and I started to get it.

Grammar schools are BS. They only select those who have been groomed - kids that come from middleclass areas.

Andrew Anderson said...

Government subsidies for private credit creation make a meritocracy IMPOSSIBLE since the rich, by whatever means including inheritance, are the most so-called creditworthy.