Friday, May 26, 2017

Southeast Asia “Forgets” About Western Terror by Andre Vltchek

Southeast Asian elites “forgot” about those tens of millions of Asian people murdered by the Western imperialism at the end of and after the WWII. They “forgot” about what took place in the North – about the Tokyo and Osaka firebombing, about the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs, about the barbaric liquidation of Korean civilians by the US forces. But they also forgot about their own victims – about those hundreds of thousands, in fact about the millions, of those who were blown to pieces, burned by chemicals or directly liquidated – men, women and children of Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Indonesia, the Philippines and East Timor. 
All is forgiven and all is forgotten. 
And once again the Empire is proudly “pivoting” into Asia; it is even bragging about it. 
It goes without saying that the Empire has no shame and no decency left. It boasts about democracy and freedom, while it does not even bother to wash the blood of tens of millions off its hands. 
All over Asia, the “privileged populaces” has chosen to not know, to not remember, or even to erase all terrible chapters of the history. Those who insist on remembering are being silenced, ridiculed, or made out to be irrelevant. 
It is all forgotten and forgiven, and the reason “why” is clear, simple. It pays to forget! 
“Forgiveness” brings funding; it secures “scholarships” just one of the ways Western countries spread corruption in its client states and in the states they want to draw into their orbit. 
The elites with their lavish houses, trips abroad, kids in foreign schools, are a very forgiving bunch! 
But then you go to a countryside, where the majority of Southeast Asian people still live. And the story there is very different. The story there makes you shiver. 
Before departing from Laos, I sat at an outdoor table in a village of Nam Bak, about 100 kilometers from Luang Prabang. Ms. Nang Oen told me her stories about the US carpet-bombing, and Mr. Un Kham showed me his wounds: 
“Even here, in Nam Bak, we had many craters all over, but now they are covered by rice fields and houses. In 1968, my parents’ house was bombed… I think they dropped 500-pound bombs on it. Life was unbearable during the war. We had to sleep in the fields or in the caves. We had to move all the time. Many of us were starving, as we could not cultivate our fields.  
I ask Ms. Nang Oen about the Americans. Did she forget, forgive? 
“How do I feel about them? I actually can’t say anything. After all these years, I am still speechless. They killed everything here, including chicken. I know that they are doing the same even now, all over the world…” 
She paused, looked at the horizon. 
“Sometimes I remember what was done to us… Sometimes I forget”. She shrugs her shoulders. “But when I forget, it is only for a while. We did not receive any compensation, not even an apology. I cannot do anything about it. Sometimes I wake up in the middle of the night, and I cry.” 
I listened to her and I knew, after working for decades in this part of the world: for the people of Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia, and East Timor, nothing is forgotten and nothing is forgiven. And it should never be!

 Millions of people were killed in Southeast Asia, but today they do not know what the West did. The installed puppet regimes teach in schools how the US saved them from murderous communism. They love Americans.

Tom talks about terrorism but nothing can compare to this. Here in the West we know nothing about it either, the bombing was often done in secret. It is banished from our history books. It's amazing, or terrifying rather, to think that millions could be killed over many years and then it gets whitewashed from history. Paul Craig Roberts calls it The Matrix.

The above excerpt does do the article justice, if you found it interesting it's worth reading the whole thing.


4 comments:

Bob said...

They've embraced capitalism. It's not forgiveness, it's just business.

Kaivey said...

It was big business too, the industrial -military complex made a fortune out of it.

Bob said...

What's behind the antipathy between Vietnam and China?

Tom Hickey said...

Age-old rivalry.

The Vietnamese are plucky and they made it too expensive for China to conquer.

The French and US learned the same lesson the hard way.