Saturday, August 4, 2018

Denis Churilov — Op-Ed: Fake Liberalism As A Tool For Trans-Atlantic Globalists


You will recognize "fake liberalism" as neoliberalism.

He says pretty much what we have been saying here for a long time.

Fort Russ
Op-Ed: Fake Liberalism As A Tool For Trans-Atlantic Globalists
Denis Churilov

24 comments:

Bob Roddis said...

The most important and salient policy of "neoliberalism" is the fiat funny money system. As MMT teaches, that system allows the government to "provision" itself by spending new funny money into existence so that average people and voters cannot see the constant loss of their wealth to the government elite and its cronies. Because of this system to "provision" the government, it is not necessary to obtain a consensus from the clueless public in order to conduct most of the big elite government projects. MMTers call that "democracy". Then, in a clever move, MMTers blame the "neoliberal" system upon Hayek who won the Nobel Prize for showing how the system causes the boom and bust cycle and who demanded it be abolished. Brilliant.

Konrad said...

I can imagine what it would be like to attend a lecture given by you. It would be a full hour of you chanting three words over and over...

Fiat funny money
Fiat funny money
Fiat funny money
Fiat funny money
Fiat funny money
Fiat funny money
Fiat funny money
Fiat funny money

End of lecture.

Tom Hickey said...

Can anyone point to a period of peace and prosperity, with minimal social, political or economic oppression, under any system in history?

Bob said...

Under what system did Polynesians live under?

Tom Hickey said...

Primitive tribal collective.

Hunter-fisher- gatherer society at the subsistence level.

http://www.everyculture.com/North-America/Polynesians-Economy.html

Bob said...

You have your answer.

Tom Hickey said...

Yes, I figured that out long ago, as did many other DFHs ("dirty fucking hippies") in the Sixties and Seventies, when turn on, tune it and drop out was the order of the day. That got reinterpreted as turn on your crap detector, tune it to what really happening at the heart and soul level, and drop out of the superficial BS. That lead to to the countercultural revolution, the alternatives movement and the underground economy that today has transformed the culture.

It was a spiritual awakening and like all such awakenings the spirit dwindles over time until it is replaced by memories, then vainly trying to keep the memories alive, and it finally dies in the letter.

Most people that grew up after that time are unaware of how much their lives are shaped by this era. But by the Eighties most of this spirit and élan had been co-opted commercially. Indeed, for those that were present in the lead up to it, Woodstock is considered to be the beginning of the end. The hippies began to be replaced by weekend hippies and then the yuppies, even Jerry Rubin, author of Do It!

Great times while it lasted but the spirit dwindled and eventually evaporated. Now only memories — some good, some not so good, Vietnam was raging at the time and after awhile the drug scene really got out of hand.

In hindsight, the Sixties and Seventies were creatures of the time and when the times change, so did the so-called hippie movement. The level of collective consciousness was not raised high enough to be sustainable over time, but it was high enough to effect a cultural and social transformation.

Back then, a lot of people did try to recapture the primitive mindset and "tribe" was a key concept. It is kept alive by the Rainbow FamilyRainbow Family.

It was also pretty clear that Marx had something like this in mind in his libertarianism of left that would be undergirded economically by socialism, which would replace the individualism, hence, alienation, of capitalism. But Marx, too, did not fully understand the role of consciousness and the requirement to raise the level of collective consciousness to a level that would support his type of system.

It's not just a change in the environmental conditions, or even a change of mind intellectually. It's a matte of heart. This was summed up quite well, in fact, in The Lazy Man's Guide to Enlightenment by Thaddeus Golan, who has apparently put it up for download.

Those times did produce an growing interest in spirituality in contrast to religion and that has been a growing trend.

Anyway, the ideas are out there waiting to be picked up. Ironically, this is happening as the last primitive people are being integrated into modern times, whether they like it or not. But there are hold-outs and they serve as reminders and examples of societies that did exist historically prior to what we now call "economies." In fact, many people now don't consider that they had economies at all, which, is of course simply a matter of definition rather than observation.

Tom Hickey said...

"Thaddeus Golan" should be "Golas." auto-correction again.

Bob said...

I'm a lazy bumblebee who failed to adapt; that book may be for me. Thank-you.

What I know of the 60s 70s is heavily focused on what happened in America. It was later that I learned of a near revolution in France, and that DFHs were present in several countries. I was born in 1967.

Bob said...

I'm a being of indifference. There are no highs or lows for me, nor do I seek experimentation with psychedelics in pursuit of such levels. Beings of love, also known as normal people, experience the ups and downs that come with passion. Nowadays, the seek refuge in drugs or alcohol for relief. There's no longer much thought about experimentation in service to developing one's spirituality.

The mind is less of a prison than the body. It behooves everyone to take advantage of that - while they still have their health. When the usual physical decline occurs, you'll be well practiced.

Is it really about love? Why not fondness, or acceptance?

Tom Hickey said...

Love is not an emotion primarily. It is a state of being, as in "being in love."

In unconditional universal love, one is in love with being as such, that is, inclusively to the max.

That requires a level of being/consciousness that is the most expanded.

That is the ideal to aspire to.

Initially love is focus on a limited object. But as the capacity to love expands, one begins to appreciate (with the "heart") the interconnectedness of all within.

This is growing evidence in one's live of the unity of being.

"Live unity, celebrate diversity."

Bob said...

I describe my state as "being indifferent", and most people's state as "being passionate".

I don't recall meeting someone whose state was "being in love". I may not have the perception to recognize it.

To aspire is a symptom of passion.

I assume that if I weren't indifferent, I'd most likely be passionate. I'd have the symptoms that most people have.

I don't aspire to anything. What is left of my curiosity is no substitute for lack of passion.

That most people are driven by passion to pursue this or that, including enlightenment, seems obvious to me. But that is just my perception.

As for lacking what is necessary to aspire... should I be envious or grateful?

Tom Hickey said...

States of being are different from mental activity that constantly changes — desires, thoughts, emotions, memories, imagination, etc.

The state of being that many if not most experience as the background of their mental activities is what Heidegger called "Angst," which translated as "anxiety" but that doesn't capture the meaning he gave to it of being aware of "the human condition" as being in time.

This "normal" state of being stands in contrast to the states of "being in love," and "being at peace," for example, and drastically different from being continuously in the state of bliss. These state are the normal and natural state of humans living at or near their full potential. These states are either at the junction of time and eternity or beyond time, in eternity.

This is why freedom from constraint and freedom to choose are insufficient in accounting for the significance of freedom, a complete concept of which required freedom for self-actualization as the unfolding of full human potential. In this sense, all individual are unique in individual potential while all persons are the same in human potential.

A full life involves progressively unfolding one's inherent potential as an individual and also as a human being. The former is limited, and the latter is unlimited. This gives rise to the inherent dignity of persons that underlies the genuine liberalism of the Enlightenment. It is also the meeting point of traditionalism in the sense of perennial wisdom correctly understood and liberalism as the necessary condition for taking responsibility for self-actualization and self-realization.

Tom Hickey said...

BTW, there is a state of "indifference" that is a highly developed state of being. In this sense of "indifferent," the indifference is being indifferent to gain and loss, and the outcome of action in general. This is also called a "state of equanimity."

Equanimity is not indifference to this and not that, but rather being continuously indifferent to all outcomes good and bad, accepting all as "the will of God," for example, neither rejoicing in gain or grieving over loss. "It's all good."

"This is the day the Lord has made,
let us rejoice and be glad in it."
— Psalm 118:24

Bob said...

Some people are genuinely satisfied with their life, be it raising a family or pursuing a career. But for others, biological and cultural norms are insufficient. At some point in their life they find these to be unfulfilling which leads to all sorts of malaise. Their response may range from remaining trapped to finding a way to overcome their "angst".

Why pursue enlightenment if you are fulfilled?

I'm indifferent to outcomes that are non-physical in nature. I remain passive in the face of adverse conditions. I find life to be worth living yet I consider it meaningless. I attribute lack of meaning to lack of passion. Physical pain is the signal that it is time for me to end my life. Not mental anguish. The worst mental anguish I've experienced was not understanding that I'm not like most people. I'm supposed to be ashamed of my lack of character.

Equanimity to outcomes that are unrelated to my physiological needs? I would say so.

Tom Hickey said...

Why pursue enlightenment if you are fulfilled?

If you are truly fulfilled your are enlightened.

But feeling fulfilled is a necessary condition but not a sufficient one.

Another necessary condition is having actualized full human potential.

The latter is a sufficient condition, since complete, abiding fulfillment is a consequence of that.

Bob said...

You appear to be saying:

Fulfillment is the inevitable consequence of enlightenment.

"A necessary result of" versus "a necessary condition for".

If you aren't asserting a causal relationship, then either condition is sufficient.

Tom Hickey said...

Conditionality is a lot simpler to establish causality., and I purposely expressed this interns of conditionality ratner than causality. I will explain.

As Hume pointed out, humans don't observe causal connections. They infer them. Inference is based on conditions, which he called constant connection. Everyone with an education has heard the statement that correlation is not causality, that is, doesn't establish causality based on evidence..

Causality is based on a conditionality in a deductive framework that is grounded in assumptions. Causality necessity is logical necessity. So-called causal necessity is the deductive certainly of axiomatic systems and axioms are stipulated, that is, assumed. Philosophy has been a search for axioms that are self-evident that can serve as absolute foundations for a causal theory of reality. In the past hundred years or so, it has become clear why this is a wild goose chase. There are no absolute criteria based on experience in ordinary consciousness.

However, the seers of perennial wisdom assert that ordinary awareness (and level of experience it affords based on sense experience of the gross world) is the most prevalent form of consciousness in this cycle of time. However, there are other levels of awareness. Some are less expanded than ordinary human consciousness, that is, the levels of evolution that precede human being. Some are more expanded and these the levels on which the testimony of the mystics and seers is based. They include subtle experience of the subtle world, mental experience of the causal world, and realization of the absolute, which is said to be "non-dual."

I can cite theory that underlies perennial wisdom that explains the causality. For example, a summary is provided in the first eight chapters of Meher Baba's God Speaks. this summary, given is some detail, is shortened in chapters 9 and 10 by leaving out the detail. But the detail reveals the causation in terms of a developmental process that is "evolutionary" in that it also incorporates the biological theory of modern science, providing a "higher level" account in terms of purpose. The sole purpose of the process is the fulfillment of the potential of all apparently separate and limited being in their realization of the absolute.

Perennial wisdom is purportedly the testimony of humans with more expanded levels of awareness, experience and knowing than ordinary people. So the argument is based on authority, which, of course, is not compelling if it doesn't accord with one's own experience. However, there are ways that ordinary people can at least begin to check for themselves, but to do this, they generally need to make a leap of faith in order to regard it as being worthwhile. Some do, some don't.

continued

Tom Hickey said...

contintuation

I don't claim to have greatly expanded awareness but I have consider the opportunity and pursued it long enough — over fifty years — to be able to report that the results have been as predicted and the experience gained appears to be continuous and "established."

So fell that I have the data to assert conditionality, but I have not confirmed the theory as a whole based on experience. But enough of it has been confirmed in my own experience to justify accepting the theory as a whole, and am or have directly acquainted with people whose experience, at least what they report, is more advanced than mine.

In the theory as a whole, there is no causality or even conditionality, since everything exists in the eternal now and noting ever happens in eternity. Phenomena, change, limitation and separation, inducing time, are appearances in finite awareness on the way to realizing infinite awareness. The sages have set forth the process in terms of (apparent) evolution to the human form, where humans have evolved the potential for infinite consciousness but don't yet realize owing to the bagged they have collected on way.

Humans reincarnate until they advance far enough to enter the spiritual path that leads through the subtle and mental worlds. This "path" passes through six planes (stations) of awareness. After traversing the path, infinite potential is realized and this is the unfolding of full potential. The attributes of this state are said to be omniscience, omnipotence, and bliss aka absolute knowledge, power. Bliss. absolute is complete fulfillment.

Those who assume the scientific world view to be correct and scientific method as the standard for gaming knowledge based on empirics will mostly like take this a nonsense and dismiss it as not worth spending time on. But in addition to the scientific approach is the philosophical approach, the mythic approach and the mystical approach, all of which lead some people to positively consider this and a few to pursue. According to the theory is the unfolding in time of "path dependence."

One could say that according to the theory, the flow conforms to the law of least action, so everything is always right on track. This is emphasized in Taoism, for instance.

There is a vast literature on this. I realized as grad student in philosophy that one needs teachers to assist on in acquiring this knowledge and since it is not primarily intellectually based, one needs "spiritual teachers" so that one doesn't need to reinvent the wheel. Once I opened up to this, those teachers showed up serendipitously, as the theory also predicts.

Bob said...

In the theory as a whole, there is no causality or even conditionality, since everything exists in the eternal now and noting ever happens in eternity. Phenomena, change, limitation and separation, inducing time, are appearances in finite awareness on the way to realizing infinite awareness. The sages have set forth the process in terms of (apparent) evolution to the human form, where humans have evolved the potential for infinite consciousness but don't yet realize owing to the bagged they have collected on way.

If that is the case, then the relationship between enlightenment and fulfillment is simply a contingent (or mutual) relationship. In a given state of being, both will be present or neither will be present. You won't have one without the other. (I'm using your definition of enlightenment and fulfillment.)

If that is the theory, then any notion of conditionality or causality would have to be dropped.

Obviously, our perception of "time" remains firmly rooted, with steps to take, paths to follow, aspirations to be achieved. It's how we make sense of the world and our lives.

I am the way I am due to a personality disorder. It wasn't something I consciously set out to obtain. It is assumed that the experiences in my life contributed to its development.

But according to the theory, where I was, where I am, and where I shall be is an illusion due to limited awareness. This is a tough nut to apply.

Humans reincarnate until they advance far enough to enter the spiritual path that leads through the subtle and mental worlds. This "path" passes through six planes (stations) of awareness.

John Michael Greer lays out a similar narrative in his Druidry handbook, with the initial 'planes of awareness' being Abred, Gwynfydd, and Ceugant. Human beings are said to be at the upper limit of Abred. This narrative involves reincarnation and a lot of trial and error.

I don't know what to do with this information. I have no memories of a past life. I have no conviction that I will recall this one after I pass away. In terms of spirituality, I'm inclined to pursue a path which will lead towards a greater reverence for nature. This means I'm biased and have chosen a destination ahead of the journey.

That being said, I'm inclined, not driven. Not getting round to pursuing it is the most likely outcome.

You are far more determined and dedicated to your pursuits. May I ask for what reasons?

Bob said...

But the detail reveals the causation in terms of a developmental process that is "evolutionary" in that it also incorporates the biological theory of modern science, providing a "higher level" account in terms of purpose. The sole purpose of the process is the fulfillment of the potential of all apparently separate and limited being in their realization of the absolute.

Is the higher purpose inevitable? Is it a cycle?

Tom Hickey said...

If that is the theory, then any notion of conditionality or causality would have to be dropped You are far more determined and dedicated to your pursuits. May I ask for what reasons?

Feedback of positive experience

Tom Hickey said...

According to the testimony of the wise, yes, there is a purpose: The sole purpose of the three relative worlds is that all beings in these three world realize that their true nature is not relative but absolute. This is the natural course of evolution, involution and realization, although the process can be accelerated by "grace" as direct transmission.

This is laid out in the perennial teaching and Meher Baba summarizes it in contemporary English in God Speaks, published in 1955. This teaching can be found in the world's oldest wisdom literature, although it differs in manner of expression among different sages and traditions, different times an different places, and different languages. This is the value of a summary in English composed recently.

Bob said...

If Guy McPherson is correct, our species is done for. At least we'll be completing a cycle.