Thursday, May 21, 2020

Muslim Chinese Street Food Tour in Xi'an, China | BEST

C J Werleman is putting out anti-China propaganda on Twitter, and Nafeez Ahmed sometimes does this too. Both are excellent journalists in every other way.

CJ Werleman says the Chinese government is forcing Xinjiang Muslims to eat pork and drink alcohol. This is total rubbish as it would greatly backfire. They would have a revolution on their hands.

Uyghur students forced to eat pork, Muslims required to drink before entering mosques, C J Werleman 

A Chinese person sent me this video.

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This video exposing "extreme oppression of Muslim food culture" has received over 1 mil views on youtube! It's just terrible!

Muslim Chinese Street Food Tour in Xi'an, China | BEST Muslim Chinese Cuisine in China





Muslim Chinese Street Food Xi'an - Chinese Street Food - Best Muslim Street Food China
Muslim Chinese street food and Chinese Food is delicious in China! I flew to Xi'an, China and have been eating street food and dumplings non stop. Best Street Food I've tasted in China, maybe even best street food in Asia! The Chinese food is so good in Xi'an! I've eaten street food in Bejing, street food in Shanghai,, and street food in Chengdui, all of which has been amazing, but I have to say that the chinese street food in Xi'an has been some of the best!

23 comments:

Peter Pan said...

Forcing them to drink bat soup would be going too far.

Marian Ruccius said...

I think that this source, from a Taiwanese philosopher, provides evidence of what the focus of our discussions really should be -- a program of suppression so brutal that it makes Stalin's deportation of the Chechens look like child's playé

https://medium.com/@samliao/teaching-the-oppression-of-uighurs-in-a-philosophy-course-c3d5456aa70e

Marian Ruccius said...

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/12/09/podcasts/the-daily/a-womans-journey-through-chinas-detention-camps.html?showTranscript=1

lastgreek said...

Apologies for the off topic article suggestion:

No Vaccine in Sight

The U.S. was once at the cutting edge of pandemic prevention. Then Big Pharma took over.

By Alexander Zaitchik (May 11, 2020)

https://newrepublic.com/article/157594/no-coronavirus-vaccine-big-pharma-drug-patent-system

PS: What worries me the most is not when we're going to have a coronavirus vaccine, but if we ever will.

Marian Ruccius said...

Kaivey, you claim you want balance, so how about posting something from the other side of the discussion, such as this seminal piece by the last person to have done dissertation ethnographic work in Xinjiang.

https://logicmag.io/china/ghost-world/

Kaivey said...

Yes, that is a concern, and it's mutating too. China has a drug that can reduce its effect by 2500% they say. Will be ready by end of 2021.

Kaivey said...

99.9% of what we read is anti-Chinese propaganda, so I'm hardly balancing it up. The idea that the Chinese government is forcing Uighurs to eat pork and drink alcohol is ludicrous. It would totally backfire. The Chinese would have a revolution on their hands.

Marian Ruccius said...

So, it is just as important for each individual to show balance in their presentation as for society as a whole to show balance. By never acknowledging the other side you undermine the value of your objections. I would say that the vast majority of reporting on Xinjiang is quite accurate. The key to propaganda is being selective with the truths you release. So if you moderate the message that it fine, but the Chinese government's actions in Xinjiang rank with the great genocides of the last century, exceeding even the residential school genocides of indigenous peoples in CAnada and the US.

Marian Ruccius said...

And Chinese crimes are obviously true, because otherwise they would let international journalists roam and interview people freely, as they do in Beijing, by and large. Until the interdictions on foreign journalists are lifted, one has to assume that the charges against the Chinese government are generally true.

Marian Ruccius said...

With the camps, China has created nearly perfect conditions for the novel coronavirus, officially dubbed COVID-19, to rapidly spread and exacerbate the current global public health crisis. Human rights monitors and survivors report the camps are overcrowded, extremely unhygienic, and rife with abuse.

https://thediplomat.com/2020/02/china-says-theres-no-risk-of-a-covid-19-outbreak-in-xinjiang-camps-dont-believe-it/

Matt Franko said...

“ overcrowded, extremely unhygienic, and rife with abuse.”

Oh.... you mean it’s like anywhere else in China then... ok...

Marian Ruccius said...

Matt, careful not to put words in my mouth! I am no defender of the Chinese Government, but y'know, as a Canadian I felt kind of a relief when I visited China, after spending some time in South-East Asia, because despite the huge population, China is so large that at times you have almost a Canadian sense of space, and physical beauty.

I think many an American might feel that way too (although as a Marylander it is possible that you might not feel the density as much). Obviously, I am not talking about downtown Shanghai ... but I understand that Xinjiang is notable for its rather low population density. So, if a re-education camp is overcrowded and rife with abuse, that's by design. On that we agree.

Matt Franko said...

You sound just like the regime-change war people... "we dont have any problem with the good and hard working people of China... just the CCP... blah blah blah..."

You sound like Steve Bannon...

Marian Ruccius said...

Really? That's interesting. I hardly listen to Bannon, so I would not know. I certainly try to think of everybody as fundamentally equal, and not to think too much in terms of ethnic collectives (although at times doing so is unavoidable). And I don't think the clash of civilizations approach has much benefit. Isn't it more useful to think of the practical reasons why people do or do not support their governments?

I remember, for instance, Solidarity dissident Adam Michnik's description of the "gray zone" within the communist apparatus, of people who did not adhere to communist values, and were sympathetic to the opposition, without taking any explicit action to support it. Are not most people like that? It is only a very hardy few who rise up against injustice, in all societies. But, the simple fact of those attitudes, I seem to call him writing, provided a space, an eye deliberately turned here or there, for the operation of dissent. And he was grateful. Still, given the capacity for brutality of the Chinese régime, I hold out little hope for change.

Marian Ruccius said...

May I suggest this great film by Kieślowski.

Amator (aka the camera buff):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jh6W8oYy7cY

Peter Pan said...

China is the new Israel. They who must not be criticized.
Those who praise China are the same people who routinely criticize the West.
And vice versa. Criticize China ~ praise the West.
This is not a coincidence.
Propagandists, like shoes, come in pairs.

Matt Franko said...

“ China is the new Israel.”

Oooooo .... I did not think of that..... that is interesting....

Matt Franko said...

“ . I certainly try to think of everybody as fundamentally equal, ”

Well Sure... That is from the US declaration.... so then we try to apply the same principles of us civil government on other nations that don’t exhibit the same principles...

This is where the “regime change wars” come from...

Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, Libya,..

The alternative would be to destroy the nation via military action... knock the whole thing down, kill everybody...

Marian Ruccius said...

I think régime change wars typically have little to do with principles, nor much to do with strategy, and are more often about the desires of specific western economic interests to control certain resources and retain regional economic hegemonies. Sometimes principles and economic interests can converge, and we thump our chests.

Viva Zelaya! Viva Correa! Viva Morales! Three cheers for the Uighurs and the Dalai Lama!

Matt Franko said...

" régime change wars typically have little to do with principles,"

they are the alternative to killing them all... which we could do in a few days... if we wanted to... which we dont...

Marian Ruccius said...

Here I sympathize with Kaivey: let's think of Sun Yat Sen. Cultural distinctiveness is not everything, but he has a point:

"Those who wish to promote the welfare of the people should advance in solidarity with them and select the path most suitable for them. Since the history of our people is different from that of the people of the West, the steps that the two peoples choose to take in order to advance must also be different."

Peter Pan said...

The steps will be different, but since they read the same economic textbooks, the outcome of the dance will be sadly familiar.

Marian Ruccius said...

@ Peter Pan: you may well be right, except for the environmental constrains, IMO