Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Welfare for the wealthy...more people are starting to catch on

I've said for a long time that welfare in the United States was not dead, it's just been taken away from the needy and given to the wealthy.

Whether we're talking about tax policy, education policy, investment policy, labor policy, banking, finance and Wall Street, the national debt, you name it...the government heaps trillions on the wealthy and guts programs left and right for the truly needy.

Here's Bob Schieffer on Face the Nation, calling it like it is. Maybe he reads this blog.

7 comments:

Ryan Harris said...

I'd be curious to compare the level of property tax big corporate farmers and mineral land owners pay compared to a small urban service industry worker for their little house or apartment as a percentage of their incomes.

Tom Hickey said...

Ideally, firms would not be subject to land taxes either, but rather the owners iaw % of ownership.

This would likely reduce the wheeling and dealing of firms over tax "incentives."

Dan Kervick said...

It's gotten to the point where I almost can't express how I feel when I see these prostituted lardasses moving their lips ... because this is the internet and so people are always looking in.

Ryan Harris said...
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Ryan Harris said...

If the data show that poor homeowners (and renters indirectly) are paying the highest property tax burden, I'd like to see an end to the agricultural and mineral property tax breaks for the very largest tracts that exist in every state. I'd also like to see an end to exemptions given to the "good" middle class and rich homeowners to instead cut taxes for the poor. I think it would create fewer perverse incentives and create a more direct transfer payment from rich to the poor for public education and the other various local government programs.

The Rombach Report said...
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The Rombach Report said...

I fail to grasp why the U.S. pays any agricultural subsidies to farmers, big or small. Why do farmers need government price support mechanisms when there are well established publicly traded futures and options exchanges where they can hedge their risk?