Sunday, July 10, 2016

Reuters — China healthcare costs forcing patients into crippling debt


Not just the US.
Official data show up to 44 percent of families pushed into poverty were impoverished by illness.
The good news is that modern health care is capable of providing treatment for many conditions that were not treatable previously. The bad news that a lot of it is very costly and only the wealthy can afford the best treatment when care is rationed by price.

Reuters
China healthcare costs forcing patients into crippling debt
Adam Jourdan and Ben Hirschler | Shanghai/London

10 comments:

Matt Franko said...

US has spent $795B so far with 2 months to go on Medicaid/Medicare probably going to go to $1T+ this FY... probably much of it on Chinese illegal immigrant people...

$1T/310m = > $3k per people in US including Chinese illegals... maybe would should debit their China Treasury account for the expense... would at least reduce "the deficit!"....

Tom Hickey said...

What "Chinese legal immigrant people"?

First, I've heard of it.

There are several thousand Chinese students at the University of Iowa, all one student visas. Many of them, especially the women, of them are dressed in the latest fashion and many, both men and women, drive new cars, a lot of them high-end.

Matt Franko said...

Looks like they are all trying to abandon ship Tom:

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-chinese-border-california-20160607-snap-story.html

Matt Franko said...

Yes higher Ed for sure the schools over there are shit... Anybody with brains is trying to get the F out of there too don't blame them ... Brain drain at the top and human trafficking at the bottom... All cohorts USD zombies on steroids....

Tom Hickey said...

The Chinese account for the fifth-largest population of immigrants in the U.S. illegally, according to an October report by the Migration Policy Institute. An estimated 285,000 resided in the country in 2013.

265,000 is a drop in the bucket in a population of over 300 million. That would not even be noticed. They would make a few Chinatowns a bit bigger and would not be competing for US jobs or welfare. These are not coolies but educated Chinese with means, as the article admits. They will contribute to the US, and the US should be happy to be getting them.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinatowns_in_the_United_States

Tom Hickey said...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Higher_education_in_China

http://wenr.wes.org/2016/03/education-in-china-2/

The Chinese educational system is similar to the Western in that a few elite schools dominate and the leaders are generally selected from these institutions. The difference is that in China merit has traditionally been the primary criterion of selection and competition for the slots in the best schools fierce. There is some politics and nepotism, of course, but unlike the West there is not a plutocratic class that funds the best schools' endowments, so that their offspring get first shot at the slots unless they are really unqualified.

The problem with education in in highly traditional societies like China is that it is not "liberal" but highly structured and rigid, about acquiring information and skills but not about thinking for oneself and exploring creative potential.

This means, for example, that students are excellent at math and science, but don't have a lot of training in applying it creatively in innovation, for instance, so tech innovation has lagged there. Moreover, these societies have experiences emigration of the most creative people to the US. China and India are noticeable examples because they are large countries and the numbers involved are large. But it is true of other countries as well. Then there are the offspring. Steve Jobs's father was a Syrian immigrant, and Obama's father was from Kenya.

As the world becomes more tightly integrated, the traditional approaches to ed will become more liberal and the liberal more traditional. One the Chinese get the creativity things going, their STEM skills are going to make them highly competitive globally. Same with Russia, which has the highest level of STEM ed.

Tom Hickey said...

BRW, both Russia and China realize that they are lagging in innovation and that they need to upgrade their educational systems to develop greater creativity.

The recent buzz word from both countries is "innovation."

Liberal education requires balancing freedom, which is necessary for creative thinking, and discipline, which is needed for rigorous thinking. Too much freedom to explore, not enough rigor in development. Too much rigor, not enough freedom.

Innovation requires both types of thinking simultaneously.

Tom Hickey said...

Oh, and teaching to the test scuttles both freedom to explore and rigor through discipline.

Teaching to the test was the basis of Mandarin education that crippled the Chinese intellectual class and became a factor in the Great Divergence leading to Western hegemony.

Bob said...

What is so great about US public education?

Tom Hickey said...

US primary and secondary public ed is mediocre relatively based on out outcomes, but US higher ed is is excellent at the top level, although there are also a lot of mediocre and crap schools, too.

A lot of foreigners come the US for higher ed because there are many good schools and a lot of slots. There is also a lot of grant $ since the US schools view diversity as a plus and the US elite sees educating foreign elites as an investment that will return many times over through the years. Many of the elite in other countries have attended US institutions of higher ed or done post-grad work at them.